The best thing about So Many Me is its raw charm. It’s just a fun game to play. Like a puppy, the game is just delightful in everything it does. You struggle to find at least one thing that’s not sickeningly enjoyable. It’s got excellent writing that fits the game’s cutesy style well, and the game’s sheer inability to be disliked can carry it past many of its faults.

So Many Me puts you in the goo of Filo, a small blob whose role is to save the world. He does this with the assistance of his cloned brothers, whom he finds throughout the game. They have assorted abilities, such as being able to turn into stone, which aid our hero on his quest. Filo understands that we prefer playing to reading and often skips through large chunks of dialogue for the sake of getting into levels. This “fourth wall not needed” style is refreshingly funny. By acknowledging how cliché the plot is, So Many Me hides the fact that the story itself is rather lacklustre. It does serve however, and is as good as it needs to be.

I should prefix this paragraph be reminding you that difficulty is subjective and that my platforming skill is equivalent to throwing bricks at your controller.

I found So Many Me to be a challenging, though a fair puzzle platformer. Each level tends to be a stramash of different sub-objectives and a single endpoint you must reach. I found the stages to be mildly difficult in both planning and execution, though fun nonetheless. The respawn points should you perish are neither generous nor punishing, and simply have you redo whatever you were working on.

The boss fights however, are where this becomes a problem. If you’ve ever thought that you love doing the same unfun task mindlessly several times, then you’re in for a treat. So Many Me‘s bosses are a stark contrast to the levels. They feature easily noticeable solutions and take little to no skill in completing. While they’re not often enough for it to be off-putting, it is a shame that they spoil otherwise very enjoyable platforming.

screenshot

Art style is never an easy thing to fit across the board and So Many Me is no exception. While it looks nice, there are often moments where an object just looks out of place. I respect that this might be purposeful, but it never felt so. The game looks pretty enough and the cutesy thematic runs just as strong here as any other aspect, but it’s nothing special.

Musically, the game is no great triumph, nor is it a let down. The audio is mostly just there, neither being repellent or awkward, but having no distinguishing characteristics.

There are legions of collectables within So Many Me. If you want a game that takes a while to 100% complete, then look no further. There are droves of the aforementioned sub-objectives, which include costumes, gameplay upgrades and raw time sinks. These are dotted throughout the levels.

This is a platformer that you can’t go wrong with. The game is just a great time and is enjoyable to play.

Review copy provided by Extend Studio for review

So Many Me Review
Platforms: Windows / Mac / Linux / Ouya Developer: Extend Studio Publisher: ORiGO Games Rating: N/A
Story8
Gameplay7
Graphics6.5
Sound6
Replayability8
Positives
  • Well written
  • Good platforming
Negatives
  • Boss fights are dull
  • Art style inconsistent
7Overall Score
Reader Rating: (0 Votes)
0.0

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