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OnlySP Favorite Games 49 - Spec Ops The Line OnlySP Favorite Games 49 - Spec Ops The Line

OnlySP 50 Favorite Games

OnlySP’s Favorite Games #49—Spec Ops: The Line

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Thanks to the staff of OnlySP, I am inviting you to come on a journey through our 50 favourite games. This week we look at a deceptively terrifying tale of war … an epic tragedy in the clothing of a boring shooter.

#49. SPEC OPS: THE LINE, by Sep Gohardani

Looking at the cover of the 2012 shooter Spec Ops: The Line, no one would be blamed for rolling their eyes. The cover shows a man holding a gun aloft, his piercing blue eyes staring intensely, cajoling you towards some mindless, indiscriminate shooting in the style of the most dreary Call of Duty games.

Smoke can be seen in the background, no doubt from one of the many explosions that the player will delight in setting off as they commit wanton murder. A helicopter also menacingly glides through the sky, offering the most generic of seals of approval. Yawn.

Except Spec Ops: The Line is not that game. Retract that yawn, because this is a game that belies expectation, instead proving itself to be the antithesis of a mindless shooter. Spec Ops is a game that puts story first, and heavily emphasises its characters and its setting not just as wallpaper to facilitate the firing of bullets, but as vehicles to tell a gratifying and worthwhile tale.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 5

The game is set amidst a succession of natural disasters in Dubai, which, prior to the game’s events, was beset with a series of intense and horrible sandstorms that are at first downplayed, but which continue to escalate until Dubai is practically rendered unliveable, abandoned by the upper classes and inhabited only by those who cannot escape. War hero Colonel John Konrad is trapped in the city along with his battalion, who he volunteers to try to help with relief efforts despite orders saying he should leave. After little to no communication for an extended period, Captain Martin Walker is sent in alongside a couple of others to try to ascertain what exactly the situation is.

If that description gives you Heart of Darkness vibes, it should, since the game takes a lot of inspiration from it, twisting the classic story to explore similar its themes in a new way. Walker could easily have been the stock grizzled, burly white main character of almost every modern shooter and he starts off that way, but soon, as every good Heart of Darkness adaptation should, the story starts to bend and twist that mould.

Walker and his two NPC companions Adams and Lugo have their preconceptions about what they are going in to, but those are soon challenged as all three are forced to evolve and adapt to the situation. The characterisation in these moments as each of them comes to realise the magnitude of events and what it means for them and their companions is executed well, and a lot of the strength of the game lies in the dialogue between these characters, and how each is affected.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 3

The way their mentality changes as the game progresses is also indicative of the game’s analysis of the themes of heroism and intervention, forcing the player to ponder the idea that their role as saviour is may be questionable after all. It uses that idea to spring a number of surprises, and the more that the line starts to blur and the player is forced to make difficult choices, the more the player realises that the situation is a whole lot more complex than it seemed.

Therein lies the game’s true strength; its handling of its central storyline and the themes associated with it are an example of excellent game writing. The title does not bother with a morality system in the style of an RPG simply because choices are not black and white. The game has no ‘paragon’ or ‘renegade’, only a gradually worsening mess that is snowballing no matter what is done against it. This idea serves to both amplify the tension, making for a more exciting experience, and allows for character development of the central trio. Unlike what its genre counterparts want you to believe, Spec Ops is not afraid to show that war, even in game form, is a whole lot less heroic than it is made out to be.

Both graphically and gameplay wise, the game is pretty unremarkable. The environments are nicely rendered but its counterparts had graphics just as good, if not better at the time. In terms of gameplay, Spec Ops hung its hat on the cover-based combat systems that continue to be so popular in shooter games these days.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 2

In the context of the game, the combat works really well because of the prevalence of guerrilla-esque warfare amidst the nicely animated desert setting and manages to make several set piece fights feel as intense and immersive as they should be, with the aid of an excellent soundtrack and score. One of the game’s triumphs, however, comes in the animation of these fights.

They are not the sanitised, free-for-all funfests of an arcade shooter game, but rather an attempt to show that ‘heroic combat’ is far less heroic than it sounds, and far more gruesome than you expect. This is a game that aims to mitigate the dopamine rush you get from a cool headshot with a gruelling depiction of what that does to the victim’s head. Spec Ops is all about consequences.

Unlike an RPG, the title lacks an option to avoid doing what you are doing once you have doubts about it, and much like the central trio, the player is locked in for better or for worse. So in amidst all the game’s set-pieces and cutscenes, that are impressive and could rival other shooters in the genre, is a lingering sense of regret that the game works hard to achieve. As the characters come to doubt themselves, so do you.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 1

Mention must be given to Nolan North’s performance in the central role of Captain Walker. His performance is one layered with nuance, and of a standard necessary for the player to understand the true gravitas of what Walker goes through over the course of the game. North again plays with the idea of the hero; the grizzled, determined type who does what is right at all costs, and shows what happens when that idea is challenged, and when Walker comes to realise that it has never been that simple. Without that kind of performance, the game certainly would not have been as impactful as it is.

Spec Ops: The Line did not sell well, and those involved in its development have since made clear that it was a harrowing experience to say the least, rubbishing the idea of a sequel. But the game does not need one. This is a game that dared to try something darker, something more thematically interesting and powerful than its counterparts, and it succeeded. The title succeeded not only in being a gripping experience, but in belittling and undermining jingoistic oversimplifications of warfare and the idea of heroism in a complicated conflict, directing its lesson not only at the characters, but also at the player.  As one of the sardonic loading screen hints say: “The United States Army does not condone the killing of unarmed combatants. But this isn’t real, so why should you care?”

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 6

Spoiler Corner with Chris Hepburn (SPOILER WARNING!)

Spec Ops: The Line offers a story unlike any other in military games. Players enter a battle—one that dares to show the true horrors of war. For example, the historic White Phosphorus scene has the player kill enemies through computerised imagery, except truth lies elsewhere.

Many times throughout the story, main character Captain Martin Walker receives a radio call from the main antagonist egging him further into battle. Not until the end is the voice revealed to stem from the character’s mental health issues, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, emphasised through flashbacks comparing what the player experienced to what really happened. The mental health issues progress into hallucinations, driving the player to choose their concluding actions—suicide, become a crazed killer, or go home living with the past.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 7

Most war games romanticize war, pitting players against hordes of generic enemies, calling them evil and saying shoot. The challenge of winning is a pull and, usually, the game features a main antagonist written to be despised. Spec Ops: The Line instead pits the player against a typical antagonist but, by the end, the reality of the battle starts to blur. The true enemy is mental illness brought on by the stresses of war. Not every game needs to make a player feel like a hero. Rather, the individual can experience a situation or limitation like they never can elsewhere. For example, in Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice, the player delves into a world ruled by mental health issues, with the objective of getting out the other side somehow and someway.

The part of Specs Ops: The Line that pushes the characters to breaking point is the White Phosphorus moment. Some critics argue that the white phosphorus is a major showing of Walker’s descent into madness. Rather, the scene can (arguably) be read as a representation of the horrors of blindly taking orders or fighting. Taking the method of attack into consideration, the player and characters only see a silhouette of an enemy through thermal imagery.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 8

The player can only blindly relate the just-seen enemy to the white silhouette, eventually confusing a mass of citizens as standing soldiers in the immediacy of battle. The player is blindly looking at who is at the end of the cannon. Through the lens of the cannon, dead enemies do not show the molten skin, nor can their cries of pain and anguish be heard. Furthermore, the player can not tell the difference between a standing soldier and a citizen. Therefore, when the blindfold is pulled off or, rather, the silhouette is detailed, both the player and the characters see the true damage that is done and have to live with it.

Veterans of war can come back with many mental health issues—a major one being PTSD. War is not a happy-go-lucky place; the truth is that the battlefield holds many saddening, scary, and traumatizing moments that can scar a person both physically and mentally.

Spec Ops: The Line gameplay screenshot 9

Spec Ops: The Line dares to tell a story that keeps the player engrossed in the fabrication  of ‘doing the right thing’, just to pull the curtain back, leaving the player with the ultimate choice of how to deal with what has happened. Games have the potential to make people feel or experience a situation that a movie could not, and not every experience in the world is a positive one. While games such as Battlefield and Call of Duty romanticize killing in the name of righteousness, Spec Ops The Line questions what—and how—in war people perceive their actions as ‘right’.

Thanks for joining us again with this disturbing, but fascinating and thoughtfully crafted entry to our 50 favourite games list. Next week’s action extravaganza is certainly much more exciting than disturbing, but no less thoughtful in its examination of conflict from the perspective of a soldier. For the latest from the world of single-player gaming, be sure to bookmark OnlySP.com, follow us on FacebookTwitter, and YouTube, and join our community Discord server.

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OnlySP 50 Favorite Games

OnlySP’s Favorite Games #34—Telltale’s The Wolf Among Us

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OnlySP Favorite Games 34 - The Wolf Among Us

Thanks to the staff of OnlySP, I am inviting you to come on a journey through our 50 favourite games. The game this week is another Telltale series (The Walking Dead is at #19) that continued to push the envelope for adventure games.

The Wolf Among Us gameplay screenshot 1

#24. TELLTALE’S THE WOLF AMONG US, by Sep Gohardani

In 2012, a video game adaptation of the popular comic book and television Show The Walking Dead catapulted Telltale Games from niche studio obscurity into the limelight. The company’s model of securing the rights to popular IPs and moulding them to its adventure game format resulted in other acclaimed titles like Guardians of the Galaxy and Batman that sought to twist the common formula and offer something different in those massive franchises.

In amidst the rising tide of their reputation, the company took a chance on something that was not quite as big or as popular, opting to give the Telltale treatment to Bill Willingham’s long-running comic book series Fables. What ensued was a wonderful twist on the tale that quite possibly makes The Wolf Among Us Telltale’s greatest achievement amidst a plethora of other very creative work.

The game is set in a world where fairytales are real, but not in the way one might expect. Instead of a magical far off land, the game is set in Manhattan (though maybe that is Manhattan for some), in a specially created enclave called Fabletown. This small settlement is where a plethora of characters from famous fairy tales and myths have been living after having fled the Homelands, which is now ruled by a mysterious, dark Adversary whose draconian regime became too difficult to bear.

The Wolf Among Us gameplay screenshot 2

Those who escaped have managed to assimilate in to America without much trouble due to cloaking magic, while any non-human ‘fables’ must use an enchantment known as a ‘glamour’ to maintain a human appearance and not arouse suspicion, or be taken off site to The Farm, a refuge that those who cannot change their appearance go to.

Bigby Wolf (formerly known as the Big Bad Wolf) is the Sheriff of Fabletown in the year 1986. He is charged with maintaining order, but Fabletown is not too eventful of a place. Soon, however, trouble is brewing and a simple trip out to help someone get home starts to unravel to reveal something dark and insidious in this last refuge of the great Fables.

This is a game that nails its tone. As soon the opening titles appear, Jared Emerson-Johnson’s brilliant score, and the moody, purple lettering of the title make clear that the game was going to be drenched in noirish atmosphere. The art style welcomes this theme: it is vivid and evocative, but never overstated, providing a rich setting for the characters and embodying both the darkness of their situation and their new gritty reality.

The Wolf Among Us gameplay screenshot 3

The player takes control of Bigby and is tasked with figuring out why things are getting increasingly out of hand when no one can afford them to, meaning lots of detective work. Bigby himself is fascinating. He is the gruff, sardonic, chain-smoking main character one might expect from a game like this, but he has nuance under that exterior. He is moulded by the decisions the player makes. The extent of the choices available mean that the way Bigby interacts with those around him dictates what the most important aspects of his personality will be, whether that is compassion, dedication, or a thirst for blood. Adam Harrington is brilliant in the role, and was well deserving of his BAFTA nomination, his main triumph being the subtlety in his line delivery and the way he makes each version of Bigby feel a bit different.

As everything unravels, Bigby slowly finds himself having more and more dots to put together as each environment contains clues and answers that are pivotal to figuring out how to stop those at the heart of the problem. This example demonstrates how immaculately written the game is that each of these moments feels gripping, from the very beginning of the first episodethrough to the end. The way the mystery is built up, with all the twists and turns along the way, makes for a thrill-ride worthy of any famous detective.

But not just the mechanics of the plot make the game Telltale’s greatest output. The characterisation of each and every one of the prominent characters is fantastic. Each citizen of Fabletown feels unique, with their own issues and opinions and sometimes even skeletons in the closet that Bigby has to deal with, and those character moments indelibly affect the way the game plays out and what sort of person Bigby wants to be. Notably characters like Snow White, who here is pragmatic and adamant that the rules in place keep the Fables safe, do end up having an impact on Bigby and his decision making, while others, like Colin the Pig, can help to show a different side to him, presenting him with many dilemmas along the way.

The Wolf Among Us gameplay screenshot 4

In this way, The Wolf Among Us becomes more than just a simple detective story. The game becomes a rich, intricate world full of complex interpersonal relationships that is barely managing to hold together and is straining even more while the mystery is solved and the threat is increased. These relationships become central to the game’s moral dilemmas, and in true Telltale style these are difficult decisions to make because the characters feel important, their perspectives understandable, their circumstances challenging. Bigby’s journey through these problems shapes him and those around him, ultimately deciding the future fate of Fabletown and potentially bringing him eerily close to the villain of the piece.

In a certain way, one can easily guess the kind of experience Telltale will provide for them in gameplay terms. The gameplay is fairly standard, and quick-time events make up a large part of the gameplay in moments of action or urgency, while exploration and discovery are encouraged in the detective work. The gameplay can at times be frustrating, but it is ultimately a mechanism to further the story and allow the player to shape Bigby in their image, according to how they would try to solve the problem.

Despite some frustration with the aforementioned quick time events, The Wolf Among Us is the adventure genre at its best. The perfect mix of characterisation, intense action, and world building works well in tandem with Telltale’s tried and tested gameplay and art style, the latter of which here is perfect. Emerson-Johnson’s score is always evocative and adds more texture to that innate feeling of immersion that the game provides. That the game will now no longer be getting a sequel due to the studio’s closure is a giant shame, but at least this example of video game storytelling at its best was made to show how it is done.

The Wolf Among Us gameplay screenshot 5

Do you have a favourite adventure game that did great work in story, but perhaps never had a fair shake? Maybe you could recommend the game for other players—why not join in the discussion below? Next week’s game also did great work with game narratives, though it is very much not an adventure game. In the meantime, you can follow OnlySP on FacebookTwitter, and YouTube, and join in with the OnlySP Discord.

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