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E3 2019

The History of E3: Looking Back on Gaming’s Biggest Event

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Every year, developers from around the world gather in June to showcase their most secret and anticipated projects. In the months leading up to E3, gamers witness the spectacle of influencers and industry veterans discussing the rumors of what might be, further fueling their desired announcements come to life. In the spirit of fun and excitement, E3 allows for the passion of gaming to be broadcast on a world stage and recognized for its influence on the entertainment industry.

Now that the industry is approaching the eve of E3, OnlySP is counting down the days remaining in a segment we like to call ‘12 Days of E3’. Please join OnlySP in celebrating an event that can be described as Christmas for Gamers, as we come together in anticipation for E3 2019!


The Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) has a relatively short history but has quickly become the gaming industry’s biggest event with inextricable ties to video game culture. The show has become the main stage for platformers and AAA developers to show off their newest projects causing mass hype across the gaming community.

E3 first debuted in 1995, and helped put the video game industry onto the world stage.

Through all of the hyper-charged excitement and cringe-inducing stumbles, the expo remains gaming’s most anticipated annual event. Over the past 24 years, E3 has evolved and adapted to fit the video game industry and culture surrounding it.

E3 1995 PlayStation

1995–2002:

Video games have been around for decades, but even in 1991 many people still did not take the industry seriously. In fact, Tom Kalinske, CEO of Sega America from 1990 to 1996, details just how casual the attitude was towards gaming.

“Back in the early 1990s we always used to show at [Consumer Electronics Show] in Las Vegas. We were there alongside the guys that were showing their new automotive speakers, or their new computing systems, or TVs, or telephones… In 1991 they put us in a tent, and you had to walk past all the […] vendors to find us, to find Nintendo and ourselves and the third party licensees.

He continued:

“I was just furious with the way that CES treated the video games industry, and I felt we were a more important industry than they were giving us credit for. So I started planning to get the hell out of CES.”

In the 1990s, video games were largely considered to be just toys, mainly in part to Nintendo’s marketing strategy at the time. Nintendo targeted the younger demographic which forced competitors to seek out alternative audiences.

Games such as Myst and Mortal Kombat appealed to an older audience, with the latter also benefiting from a movie of the same name in 1995. These titles were perhaps too successful in capturing the attention of adults because many people expressed issues with the blood and violence.

Therefore, fearing government oversight, game publishers created the Interactive Digital Software Association (ISDA). The ISDA then became the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), a united bloc representing the games industry. The ISDA proposed the ESRB, which standardised age ratings for games based on the existing ratings for movies. The United States Congress approved the ESRB and allowed the gaming industry to continue.

New advances in technology helped the home-PC market to grow as well as widespread use of 3D graphics which in-turn provided gaming new opportunities to branch out. In 1993, Sony began developing the PlayStation: a giant leap forward for gaming, as Sony was highly regarded as a reliable electronics company.

The first E3 in 1995 was an immense success registering over 40,000 attendees (see video below of E3’s first expo). At this time, the console wars were in full swing and everyone was scrambling for a piece of the pie.

Games from 1995 onwards drove the industry to focus on game presentation. Titles like Tomb Raider and Resident Evil pushed technology to new boundaries, exploring new genres, cinematic storytelling and visual masterpieces.

The industry had moved into the beginning of modern gaming.

2002–2009:

By the time the sixth generation of consoles had rolled out, gaming was huge, but the platformers had narrowed to the big three—Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo. By 2002, these three companies dominated at E3 for the next eight years.

2005 marked the first time E3 gained media coverage by G4 television networks, and E3’s attendance also soared reaching 70,000. The hype surrounding the expo would only grow, as 2005 saw the announcement of the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.

However, the E3 expo quickly became a victim of its own success. The ESA scaled down the conference because exhibitors felt it had become too difficult to reach their target audience due to the overwhelming growth of gaming media.

As a result, from 2007 to 2008, E3 was rebranded to ‘E3 Media & Business Summit’. Attendance was limited to 10,000 people. In a bit of irony, this move damaged E3 as media coverage became severely limited.

E3 had become a largely corporate event and whilst the Media & Business Summit was far more manageable, it nearly became the engine of its own downfall. The ESA realised that bloggers, journalists, and personalities drove the expo’s momentum and hype.

E3 2009 Sony

2009–2018:

In 2009, ESA rebranded again, but back to the more familiar and catchy E3 and opened its doors once again to a wider audience, drawing 41,000 attendees. The following year saw big game developers presenting alongside the big three platformers for the first time. Ubisoft, Konami, and EA contributed their gaming products helping to further expand E3’s reach.

In 2017, E3 opened up its doors to the public for the first time allowing fans to attend talks, meet representatives of companies, and play samples of upcoming new games. Furthermore, with streaming services and online platforms growing in popularity, E3’s popularity continued to grow. E3 was also able to stream live content out to millions of people around the globe who could not attend.

Once again, E3’s success also meant that some companies struggled to reach desired audiences, especially with so much competition. Nintendo was the first big name to depart from E3 to begin showcasing its games through Nintendo Direct. Electronic Arts (EA) then followed by launching their own presentations with EA Play.

E3 has also been pivotal in supporting indie games by increasing coverage; last year saw big-name publishers such as Microsoft and Bethesda feature indies as part of their mainstage lineup.

E3 2018

To 2019 and Beyond:

E3 has firmly forged its position as gaming’s most prestigious event and this year’s event will start on 11 June. The show is sure to bring in huge crowds once again with exciting AAA and indie games announced for 2019–2020 releases, with fans and media desperate for more information on these anticipated new titles.

However, E3 can sometimes have an unfortunate effect on game developers by ramping-up hype about the games it showcases. At E3 2018, Anthem was one of the most highly anticipated games, but ultimately failed to follow through on the high expectations when it was released in February this year.

Perhaps games such as Anthem would have gone down like a lead balloon anyway, but maybe E3 raised expectations far beyond what Anthem was capable of.

Furthermore, Sony shocked the games industry by announcing that it was not going to attend E3 2019, and then unconventionally announced details of the Playstation 5 in an interview with Wired.

These recent moves ultimately beg the question: is E3 even necessary anymore?

In its current form, E3 seems to be paying homage to the past—a time before self-made developers and 24/7 gaming coverage on streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube. Whether E3 will adapt to the ever-changing gaming landscape, however, remains to be seen.

To see more from our 12 Days of E3, be sure to follow OnlySP on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Also, be sure to join the discussion in the community Discord server.

Steve's two passions are journalism and gaming and has written for other publications before joining OnlySP. He likes to play RPG and Action/Adventure games on consoles, and sometimes wears a baseball cap backwards

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E3 2019

The Outer Worlds is Proof of Obsidian’s Ability to Build a Universe

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The Outer Worlds

Obsidian Entertainment has consistently put out stellar RPGs for the last decade, but all of its creative juices have been strained of originality. Fallout: New Vegas and South Park: The Stick of Truth, while loved by many, are not synonymous with the Obsidian name. Though the developer has taken a crack at its own IP before, The Outer Worlds looks like the world’s first real taste of an unhinged Obsidian. Bringing together everything fans love about Obsidian-led games with the production values of a AAA RPG, The Outer Worlds plans to show players what the team can do when given time and the right tools.

Thanks to Obsidian’s generosity, OnlySP was given the chance to check out a behind-closed-doors viewing of the game at E3 2019. Even though the footage was hands-off, what was shown was more than enough to justify high hopes.

Obsidian has worked up enough goodwill in the last decade to fill a wasteland. From the moment the demo started, The Outer Worlds proved that Obsidian deserves all of its praise. 

Falbrook, a town on the planet Monarch, was showcased in the demo’s early moments and looked to offer Rockstar Games-levels of character. Townsfolk were walking around, talking with each other as business carried on as usual. The western, sci-fi fusion felt lived-in and was a nice reminder that Obsidian can do more than just make gripping RPG gameplay.

From the streets of Falbrook, the player walked into a nearby bar area to talk with an NPC. Here, dialogue and the importance of choice was shown in full effect. Those familiar with Fallout: New Vegas will find similar NPC interactivity here, as dialogue options have varying paths to take. Of course, standard options can be chosen to progress the story or learn more about another character’s background. Again following the example of Fallout was how dialogue can change depending on how the player character is set up. Obsidian did not go into detail about how dynamic this feature can be but did give the example of unique dialogue options for players who choose to have a low-intelligence character.

A true Fallout: New Vegas spiritual successor needs more than the classic RPG developer’s advanced dialogue, though, and The Outer Worlds’s combat offered just that. Though appearing sluggish during the first encounter, combat can pick up quickly. For example, The Outer World’s has a slow-motion mechanic called Tactical Time Dilation, which can most easily be compared to Fallout’s V.A.T.S. mechanic. This spin on an ability familiar to both Obsidian and Fallout fans alike is a great example of the developer’s willingness to blend its past experience with new ideas. Similar mechanics have been a staple of modern games, though normally can only be found in arcade-like games. Seeing such an arcadey ability used in a proper RPG was refreshing and should offer some hope to those worried The Outer Worlds could be all bark and no bite.

Obsidian doubled down on the importance of choice shortly after the first encounter by stressing the choices players can make both outside and inside combat. Again, as seen in many modern games, The Outer Worlds promises the option to take a stealth approach when infiltrating enemy lines.

What was really stunning about everything shown in the demo was the world and universe building. Leaving the town of Falbrook, which was interesting in its own right, led to fungal treetops that towered over the landscape. Pollen and spores filled the air as the player progressed onward. Obsidian claims the game will remind players of the team’s dark sense of humor, and the creatures and environments are unique both in name and appearance. The Outer Worlds looks to be both lived-in and well-realized, thus justifying its existence in the process. The entire reason Obsidian, or any developer for that matter, needed to take a leap of faith with its own IP was to prove it can produce a world worth living in. Despite gameplay and RPG mechanics that may not be wholly unique, the game’s namesake is.

Obsidian is promising outer worlds that are brimming with character. The Outer Worlds, while not promising anything too outside of the box in terms of gameplay, looks to offer a world like no one has ever seen before. Expect a much more polished Fallout: New Vegas with environments built from the ground up when The Outer Worlds finally finds its way to shelves on October 25, 2019 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. 

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